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Author Topic: New (again) to Baitcasters - Good Starting Line Size?  (Read 383 times)

philm63

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New (again) to Baitcasters - Good Starting Line Size?
« on: October 31, 2020, 06:11:50 AM »

Ok so I'm going to dive into baitcasters for the first time in a looooooong time - I only dabbled in the world of casting setups but stuck mainly with spinning gear my whole lake fishing life. I've got it narrowed down to two reels to choose from for my first "good" baitcaster, and at the same time I'm bouncing back and forth between braid sizes.

I know it comes down to how I'm going to fish it - what baits, what techniques and all that - but to get the ball rolling I want to choose something that will fit the bill for a wide variety of baits and techniques. And later down the road I can add more rods and reels for more specific setups as I progress.

I'll be using my old Loomis GL3 7' MH/F and either a Curado K or Tatula SV TW in a 7 speed. The two lines I'm bouncing back and forth between are PowerPro Braid in 30 or 40 Lb. I can't seem to pin down which of the two sizes would be best for me - for starting out - for learning how to cast these things - for a wide variety of bait types and sizes.

I may throw an unweighted t-rigged Senko or a 3/8 oz spinner bait, or a 1/2 oz jig with a trailer. Dunno, could be any of these baits so I'd like to have something that covers the spectrum for my first run at baitcasting.

I want to like it but know next to nothing about it, and certainly would prefer to have a good experience the first time out rather than struggling and spending a bunch of money and deciding I like spinning better.

So 30 Lb braid, or 40 lb braid for my first baitcaster?
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Bassinlou

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Re: New (again) to Baitcasters - Good Starting Line Size?
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2020, 06:54:52 AM »

For my general fishing outfits, I have 40lb PP spooled on them.

LgMouthGambler

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Re: New (again) to Baitcasters - Good Starting Line Size?
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2020, 06:55:49 AM »

I would opt for the 40lb, but also check the actual diameter of the line. Not all braids are the same.
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philm63

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Re: New (again) to Baitcasters - Good Starting Line Size?
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2020, 08:55:22 AM »

Good input - thanks guys!  ~c~
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Fun4me

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Re: New (again) to Baitcasters - Good Starting Line Size?
« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2020, 09:43:13 AM »

Are you choosing between #30 or #40 for strength, or casting concerns?

Are you tying baits directly to braid, or are you considering using leaders?

Do you care if you have to open a reel to adjust the brakes?

To the first question; Generally speaking, smaller diameter braid sizes have a better chance at digging into the spool and causing some casting issues. These issues only happen IMO for the first or second cast after a fish catch etc. The thing is, in my experience, most all diameter braids do it to some extent. It's just a part of using braid, and I just adjust accordingly. Ex. I have #20 PP braid on a reel. The advantage of thinner braid is casting further. I also have #20 fluoro on a reel I use for bladded jigs, spinnerbaits, jigs, etc. I'm pretty confident hammering hook sets, and horsing fish out of cover with #20 fluoro, #20 braid is just as strong (although not as abrasion resistant). Point being, if you are only going to use one line, I would go smaller diameter. Power Pro makes a braid called Maxcuatro. It's pricey, but it's 25% smaller diameter for pound rating. Meaning #40 has the strength of #40 pound, but the diameter closer to #30. Could be an option if you want strength and diameter.

To the second question; using a leader will somewhat hamper my suggestions for question 3

To the third question; I own Tatulas with the TW, and Curado DC's. I enjoy not having to open the reel to adjust the brakes. It's a minor thing, but something I try to avoid. Both reels you suggested are good reels, but the regular Curado requires the side plate to be removed to adjust the brakes. The Daiwa has a dial on the outside. 

Back to the leader question. If you want to ever use a leader longer than about 6 ish feet, the T-Wing could become an issue. I have found that the only knot that will easily pass through the TW is an FG knot. Not a big deal, but you're limited to mostly that knot.

I don't know if any of this helps you make a decision, but my suggestion would be the Daiwa  SV TWS with #40 Maxcuatro, or #30 regular PP. The SV spool will help with casing light/weightless baits while still being great for larger baits. Having said that, you're not going to lose much by going with larger dia. braid and a Curado. Either combination you decide to go with will be fine. It comes down to splitting a few hairs over casting distance, fall rates of weightless baits etc.

All of this is just my opinion of course
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SteveTX

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Re: New (again) to Baitcasters - Good Starting Line Size?
« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2020, 11:07:43 AM »

I would suggest 40lb. I like Sufix 832 40lb has the equivalent of 10lb mono so its still a small diameter line. You can probably use 30lb and not notice a difference but a little bigger line may help with it digging in. Since your just getting back into baitcasters that may he a slight help while getting back use to things.

Over all I think your splitting hairs one or the other. Specifically in Sufix its .002 of a inch difference between 30 and 40lb. Neither choice is a bad choice. As for having a good experience the first time out I'd suggest few things.
1. Being its been awhile I suggest you fill about a 3rd of your spool with a 10 or 12 lb mono backing. Then your braid needs to be spooled pretty snug on after that. Then it wouldn't hurt to take a piece of tape and tape the line down leaving you only about 40 yards to fish with. This will hopefully save you from blowing up an entire spool in the event you have a bad mishap.
2. When adjusting the reel spool tension knob set it where when you are adjusting for the lure to fall where the lure just barely will fall. Almost like you have to jiggle the rod to get it to fall. This tighter setting stops a lot of over run. Sure if you totally mess up like hit the lure on the TM its gonna still blow up. But a decent cast your late thumbing or not remembering to make sure the line is starting back on without a loop this helps a lot with.
3. Don't try and bomb a cast to the moon. Start out slowly and work your way up to longer casts. As you get more comfortable and get your feel for it you can ease ever so slightly off on the spool tension knob. You will notice the same effort will now produce a longer cast. Just remember to make sure to get the line taught before you start reeling it back onto the spool. A small loop in that spool can cause a huge mess on the next cast.  lo
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Pferox

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Re: New (again) to Baitcasters - Good Starting Line Size?
« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2020, 01:35:02 PM »

Anything over 20lb is a go to for braid IMHO, it is actually hard to tell the difference between the bunch in question by looking at it.

Here are a couple of tips for using braid on ANY reel, baitcasting or spinning, that really helps:

Keep the line TIGHT on the spool, either use some type of line winding assistant that will give you a lot of pressure on the line, or use the Tree (or bumper) trick.

Lighten up on your drag a bit, to 1/3rd the lb weight or less.  If you run into a tight spot you can always tighten it up.  Use your thumb on the spool during hookset, it is easier on the digging in thing.

I do a lot of long casts from the beach, and in my experience, these two tips have kept me getting consistent long casts without the digging in problem on lighter lines.



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philm63

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Re: New (again) to Baitcasters - Good Starting Line Size?
« Reply #7 on: November 01, 2020, 05:57:55 AM »

Are you choosing between #30 or #40 for strength, or casting concerns?

Phil - Knowing I'm splitting hairs here, it's really all about the experience for me - but if I had to choose, it'd be casting; not worried too much about strength just yet...

Are you tying baits directly to braid, or are you considering using leaders?

Phil - Tying baits directly to the braid.

Do you care if you have to open a reel to adjust the brakes?

Phil - Leaning more toward the Tatula SV TW - it's very likely it'll be the one I go with.

...The advantage of thinner braid is casting further. ...if you are only going to use one line, I would go smaller diameter. Power Pro makes a braid called Maxcuatro.

Phil - Looking into that now...

...my suggestion would be the Daiwa  SV TWS with #40 Maxcuatro...

Good stuff. And yet another reason I hang around here - so much to learn.
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philm63

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Re: New (again) to Baitcasters - Good Starting Line Size?
« Reply #8 on: November 01, 2020, 06:03:54 AM »

Being its been awhile I suggest you fill about a 3rd of your spool with a 10 or 12 lb mono backing. Then your braid needs to be spooled pretty snug on after that. Then it wouldn't hurt to take a piece of tape and tape the line down leaving you only about 40 yards to fish with. This will hopefully save you from blowing up an entire spool in the event you have a bad mishap.

Phil - Interesting tip - thanks!

When adjusting the reel spool tension knob set it where when you are adjusting for the lure to fall where the lure just barely will fall. Almost like you have to jiggle the rod to get it to fall. This tighter setting stops a lot of over run.

Phil - Another gem; thanks!

Start out slowly and work your way up to longer casts. ...remember to make sure to get the line taught before you start reeling it back onto the spool.

Again - thanks for the help, guys. This is very much appreciated.
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philm63

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Re: New (again) to Baitcasters - Good Starting Line Size?
« Reply #9 on: November 01, 2020, 06:10:34 AM »

Keep the line TIGHT on the spool, either use some type of line winding assistant that will give you a lot of pressure on the line, or use the Tree (or bumper) trick.

Phil - Tree? Bumper? Never heard of those (yet) but I am definitely interested...

Lighten up on your drag a bit, to 1/3rd the lb weight or less.  If you run into a tight spot you can always tighten it up.  Use your thumb on the spool during hookset, it is easier on the digging in thing.

Priceless. Really; confidence effectively boosted. Thanks for the great tips!
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Pferox

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Re: New (again) to Baitcasters - Good Starting Line Size?
« Reply #10 on: November 01, 2020, 08:10:28 AM »

The tree or bumper method is where you tie the line to one of those objects, and then walk out the line until you have unspooled the reel, then crank it back in with the drag on max and a bend in the rod. 

This will give you a very tight wrap on the reel.  If you find you are having troubles with the line, like digging in and backlashes, try the tree trick before giving up on the line.
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BlaineD

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Re: New (again) to Baitcasters - Good Starting Line Size?
« Reply #11 on: November 03, 2020, 08:30:34 AM »

I would suggest 40lb. I like Sufix 832 40lb has the equivalent of 10lb mono so its still a small diameter line. You can probably use 30lb and not notice a difference but a little bigger line may help with it digging in. Since your just getting back into baitcasters that may he a slight help while getting back use to things.

Over all I think your splitting hairs one or the other. Specifically in Sufix its .002 of a inch difference between 30 and 40lb. Neither choice is a bad choice. As for having a good experience the first time out I'd suggest few things.
1. Being its been awhile I suggest you fill about a 3rd of your spool with a 10 or 12 lb mono backing. Then your braid needs to be spooled pretty snug on after that. Then it wouldn't hurt to take a piece of tape and tape the line down leaving you only about 40 yards to fish with. This will hopefully save you from blowing up an entire spool in the event you have a bad mishap.
2. When adjusting the reel spool tension knob set it where when you are adjusting for the lure to fall where the lure just barely will fall. Almost like you have to jiggle the rod to get it to fall. This tighter setting stops a lot of over run. Sure if you totally mess up like hit the lure on the TM its gonna still blow up. But a decent cast your late thumbing or not remembering to make sure the line is starting back on without a loop this helps a lot with.
3. Don't try and bomb a cast to the moon. Start out slowly and work your way up to longer casts. As you get more comfortable and get your feel for it you can ease ever so slightly off on the spool tension knob. You will notice the same effort will now produce a longer cast. Just remember to make sure to get the line taught before you start reeling it back onto the spool. A small loop in that spool can cause a huge mess on the next cast.  lo

This method of spool tensioning is only for non Daiwa reels. The Magforce Daiwas like the Tatula SV you adjust the tension knob to where you feel just a hint of movement side to side. Then the only adjustment after that when you switch lures is the magnetic adjustment. Works great.

To keep line tight while spooling, I have used the tree method. Lately what I do is spray a rag with conditioner and squeeze the hell out of the line with the rag as I spool it. Has worked well with braid and fluoro.

You canít go wrong with either reel or line. One observation with my SV would be that smaller braid casts further but is more difficult to manage. As in the spool overruns far easier, and it does dig in if you have a tight drag setting. Larger braid casts and handle way easier. I typically only use 50#. With the SV, itís advantages are mitigated with 50#. So I would try the 40 as a max size in that reel. The Curado, the bigger the better.

I have found that 10-12 pound fluoro is about ideal on the SV for casting distance and light rigs, and the latter is what an SV really brings to the table. Lighter stuff like 1/4-3/8 and skipping.

Now if you are going to be whipping these rigs trying to make long casts and not using your thumb? Curado. If you want easy to adjust and not birdnesting when you just drop a bait on the deck? Tatula. I recommend keeping your thumb on both just to ensure reliable casts.


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