Bass Fishing Forum Bass Fishing Forum

Site Slogan

News: NEW FORUM! Yes, this is UB! Feedback HERE!

Fishing Line Stress Factors

(Read 717 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.


BECOME A CHARTER MEMBER SUPPORT UB

Bud Kennedy

  • Life Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11,158
  • Location: Myrtle Beach, SC
  • Gender: Male
  • PFD's and KILL SWITCHES SAVE LIVES
Just how heavy of a line do you really need?  Why is it we use 50lb + line to catch a 6 lb fish.  I started to think about that and could not really pin anything down other then stress factors that we add to the work load we ask the line to handle. 

So here are my questions.  Does a rod add or reduce line stress.  How much stress gets added by the size and type of sure you are using.  I would think a hooked fish adds stress to the line just as a matter of the fight and then of course, How much added pressure is placed on the line by various types of vegetation.

So if I think about these things, how much do the stress factors fold into the line selection process.  Makes me wonder if it is 10% or 90% and everything in between.  Maybe that is why recommendations often seem like over kill given the size of the fish you catch.

This is a weird feeling post and I hope you get the point of my questions. or maybe this is one of those things to just accept as fact because heavy line works.


merc1997

  • Sponsors
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,223
  • Location: cassville, mo.
  • Gender: Male
  • Baby Bass
many times line size is determined much more by the cover one is fishing in.  back in the old days of table rock, you would get your big ol' heavy 14lb. test line broken like thread.

bo

Bassinlou

  • CM Chief Community Diplomat
  • *****
  • Posts: 29,064
  • Location: South FL
  • Gender: Male
many times line size is determined much more by the cover one is fishing in. 

bo

Bo, pretty much summed it up, and todays rods and hardware can handle these super lines just fine for years and years.

Pferox

  • Life Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16,098
  • Location: Baytown, TX
  • Gender: Male
  • Right on the Gulf Coast.
It is so amazing how a 5lb fish can weigh 20lbs with the right vegetation.
"If you think you are too small to be effective, you have never been in bed with a mosquito" - African Proverb.  Jim

philm63

  • Charter Member
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 70
  • Location: Plain City, OH
  • Gender: Male
Fear of losing my lure is the main reason I thought to put 30 Lb braid on a rod rated for 12-20 Lb line. A little extra insurance. Still lost a jig pulling it through a tree, though...

Gotta believe pulling hard on a snagged lure puts a lot of stress on your line.

Smallie_Stalker

  • CM Community Diplomat
  • ****
  • Posts: 21,108
  • Location: Quincy, Massachusetts
  • Gender: Male
  • Dobyns Rods When fishing is more than just a hobby
Line diameter can be another factor. If I'm throwing a Zara Spook or Nip-iDidee for example I could technically throw it on 20 lb. braid, but the thin diameter could get tangled in the props/hooks.  50 or 65 lb. Braid will have the diameter to prevent that.

Sent from my LM-V600 using Tapatalk

Dobyns Rods   Titan Tungsten   Abu Garcia  Berkley  Pflueger  Spiderwire

apiazza

  • Charter Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 869
  • Location: Hanover, PA
  • Gender: Male
  • Professional Bad Angler
I need my line to reel in 20lb treepounders and log fish that my jackhammer is stuck in. Those bad boys ain't cheap ...just saying.

Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk


zippyduck

  • Charter Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9,720
  • Location: Butler, Pa.
  • Gender: Male
  • Dobyns, Daiwa, LSCR, Nutech, Keitech, Yamamoto
The largest stress comes on the hookset. Hence why Bo broke the old 14lb line so easily, ever see his hookset.  :shocking:
So look at what type of lure and the situation you are fishing to determine line weight, diameter, and type.

Jigs and heavy t-rigs are going to need heavier line in a braid because of the shock factor on those quick and hard hooksets with a stiffer rod. If using a mono the line power can be taken down a lot due to the stretch in the line giving you less stress on the line itself.

Now cranking and other moving baits need far less of a hookset to penetrate the fish mouths. You can get away with a lot less power in your line. As the bait is already moving and will the hooks are generally less bulky. This is just for hooksets. As there are many other reasons also for smaller line diameters and powers in moving baits.
Flouros have a real problem built in to there very nature. Using flouro for jigs is going to need a much heavier line than mono. Flouro has some stretch but not enough IMO to compensate for those He-Man hooksets. Break offs are going to happen with flouro more often than the other two. To fix it would require a line power that would make it uncastable.
3rd place 2017 UB IBASS 377.75"
AOY 2018 IBASS Cool Casters  369.00"
AOY 2019 IBASS Cool Casters  362.50"

Princeton_Man

  • CM Community Diplomat
  • ****
  • Posts: 13,939
  • Location: Princeton, WV
  • Gender: Male
  • My Mission is goin' fishin'
Two more factors to keep in mind is that there's resistance in the water itself and that 6lb fish is fighting against you and pulling to get away. Add pulling through vegetation/cover and it's easy to understand the need for higher line weight.


Stratos 285 XL Pro 150 Evinrude ETEC

Dobyns Rods - LSCR Club

merc1997

  • Sponsors
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,223
  • Location: cassville, mo.
  • Gender: Male
  • Baby Bass
The largest stress comes on the hookset. Hence why Bo broke the old 14lb line so easily, ever see his hookset.  :shocking:
So look at what type of lure and the situation you are fishing to determine line weight, diameter, and type.

Jigs and heavy t-rigs are going to need heavier line in a braid because of the shock factor on those quick and hard hooksets with a stiffer rod. If using a mono the line power can be taken down a lot due to the stretch in the line giving you less stress on the line itself.

Now cranking and other moving baits need far less of a hookset to penetrate the fish mouths. You can get away with a lot less power in your line. As the bait is already moving and will the hooks are generally less bulky. This is just for hooksets. As there are many other reasons also for smaller line diameters and powers in moving baits.
Flouros have a real problem built in to there very nature. Using flouro for jigs is going to need a much heavier line than mono. Flouro has some stretch but not enough IMO to compensate for those He-Man hooksets. Break offs are going to happen with flouro more often than the other two. To fix it would require a line power that would make it uncastable.
floro also fractures, and that is why it will not stand up to a slack line hook set, but does well when pressured evenly.

bo