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What lures would you throw on the following reels

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ShimmyDobs21

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Shimano CHRONARCH MGL150 XG

Daiwa TATULA SV TWS 100HS

Daiwa TATULA CT 100HS

Shimano SCORPION MGL150 XG 

Shimano CURADO 200 XG 

So the idea, is for you to pick a reel to throw the following:

1. Moving baits
2. Texas rigs and jigs
3. Frogs and swimbait
4. Lipless crankbaits, Squarebill, Swimjig, Chatterbait, Spinnerbait
5. All purpose


Bud Kennedy

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Easy answer for me.  I would fish everything on a Daiwa SVTW103 series reel just pick a retrieve speed you want to use.

The real deal however is not really about the reel, it will be about your rod selection and line selection.  Even with the right reel but on the wrong rod you would be severely handicapped to work the bait properly.  Bottom line for this question.......THINK ROD.......

Mike Cork

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Shimano CHRONARCH MGL150 XG
2. Texas rigs and jigs
This is a fine machine and great for pitching all sizes of baits. I just don't think you can get a finer reel for pitching plastics or jigs to cover.

Daiwa TATULA SV TWS 100HS
1. Moving baits
The Tat is a great reel and will work for a lot of techniques. Personally I keep a finger on my line when fishing a bottom or feel bait. The T Wing drives me nuts because I can feel it jump in and out of the T Wing its self and I keep thinking I have bites when it's just the reel. This reel will cast most baits and provide easy braking changes as you swap baits.

Daiwa TATULA CT 100HS
5. All purpose
As I mentioned with the other Tat, these are great all purpose reels. You can tie on a whopper plopper and go to town, but change to a spinner bait and easily make adjustments to the braking and be ready to keep on keeping on.

Shimano SCORPION MGL150 XG
4. Lipless crankbaits, Squarebill, Swimjig, Chatterbait, Spinnerbait
This reel will be awesome for casting this baits. My only concern is spool size. The 150 should be big enough. But if it's well tuned you might be able to cast nearly all the line off with a lipless crank bait  :surrender: However this reel is well suited for long casts across flats, points, along shorelines.

Shimano CURADO 200 XG
3. Frogs and swimbait
This will be the biggest reel and hold the most line I believe, making it better suited for larger baits and longer casts.


Bud, insider knowledge, he already has these reels so he's trying to work with what he has   ;)
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Bud Kennedy

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Mike, I understand the reel deal but have to stand on my original position about the rod.  I agree that the reels are designed   for different duties but the rod also needs to be correct to maximize the overall reel performance.    As the phrase goes...it takes two to tango... and in this case you can also throw in the line types.

FD

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Mike, I understand the reel deal but have to stand on my original position about the rod.  I agree that the reels are designed   for different duties but the rod also needs to be correct to maximize the overall reel performance.    As the phrase goes...it takes two to tango... and in this case you can also throw in the line types.
I agree Bud.  As a nerd rod builder, I get to play with every combination you can think of.  Rods are built with specific lure and line weights in mind.
That being said, you can cast any bait with any rod/reel combo. 

However, if you are looking to tune performance, you must start with the rod.  The rod accounts for 70% of distance, line is 20% and the proper reel will give you that last 10%.

To answer the OP's question we need to start with his current rod selection.

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FD

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Mike, I understand the reel deal but have to stand on my original position about the rod.  I agree that the reels are designed   for different duties but the rod also needs to be correct to maximize the overall reel performance.    As the phrase goes...it takes two to tango... and in this case you can also throw in the line types.
I agree Bud.  As a nerd rod builder, I get to play with every combination you can think of.  Rods are built with specific lure and line weights in mind.  The right rod can make a cheap reel look good.  The converse is even more true, the wrong rod will severely affect the performance a great reel.

That being said, you can cast any bait with any rod/reel combo. 

However, if you are looking to tune performance, you must start with the rod.  The rod accounts for 70% of distance, line is 20% and the proper reel will give you that last 10%.

To answer the OP's question we need to start with his current rod selection.

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Bassinlou

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Mike, I understand the reel deal but have to stand on my original position about the rod.  I agree that the reels are designed   for different duties but the rod also needs to be correct to maximize the overall reel performance.    As the phrase goes...it takes two to tango... and in this case you can also throw in the line types.
I agree Bud.  As a nerd rod builder, I get to play with every combination you can think of.  Rods are built with specific lure and line weights in mind.
That being said, you can cast any bait with any rod/reel combo. 

However, if you are looking to tune performance, you must start with the rod.  The rod accounts for 70% of distance, line is 20% and the proper reel will give you that last 10%.

To answer the OP's question we need to start with his current rod selection.

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FD hit the nail on the head with this post. Until this year, I believed it was reel, line, rod for a "x" technique. Nope!! I was way off, its, rod, line, reel.  Having the right rod for "x" application will compliment the reel.

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Guys I totally get the rod deal and totally agree. I was just making note to Bud that the OP is locked into these reels because he already has them and it wasn't a matter of what to purchase. As Bud said I'd use only "xxx" reels.

Yes the rod these reels are placed on is important, but it wasn't the OP's question.
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bigjim5589

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I'm not familiar with these reels, so have no opinion, but generally for each type of lure, may use reels that have different retrieve ratios & speeds and inch per handle turn line retrieve rates.

This has been discussed before as far as what types of reels and gear ratio's to use for specific types of lures. It can certainly vary too, since people are all different and have preferences.

So maybe match up the ratio & line retrieve to the lures is a good way of matching these reels you have, then match them to rods that also will fit how you like to fish these lures.

Keep in mind that ratio may not always relate well to actual retrieve speed in inch per turn of the reel handle, which is a better indicator of how fast you'll get line back on the reel. Most reels these days handle winching in fish very well, so think of it as how fast do I want or need to get the lure back after a cast. There are other considerations too since the amount of line on the spools affects the retrieve rate, but that's something you'll have to figure out when fishing, so see what you like best.

1. Moving baits -   I like a reel for moving lures that has a ratio in the 6.3 to 1 range. That's a average rate IMO, so you can retrieve lures fast or slower.

2. Texas rigs and jigs - For jigs & plastics, such as T -rigged, a faster speed, 7:1 ratio which allows for quickly getting them back for another cast. The reel isn't doing the work with these lures, it's the person holding the rod and the rod, so a faster reel works well. Some folks probably like an even faster reel, but I think that's as fast as I own.

3. Frogs and swimbait - either of those ratio's work fine for me, and then inch per turn of the handle may be more important. I wouldn't really consider these two types of lures that similar. To me fishing the frog is more like fishing a jig, and the swimbait like the moving baits, such as spinnerbaits or crankbaits.

4. Lipless crankbaits, Squarebill, Swimjig, Chatterbait, Spinnerbait  - these would all be the same as moving baits for me, and again, there's probably not any single answer, as personal preferences come into play. At least a reel with around 6.3:1 ratio.


5. All purpose  - I have one reel that has a 5.3:1 ratio, and it's what I would consider a general use, all purpose reel. I don't even know if any reel brands are still making them with such a ratio now, but you almost can't retrieve too fast with it. It's certainly not ideal if you do need a fast retrieve however. I like a reel like this for big & deep diving crankbaits, but that's not the only use. If I didn't have a reel like that with a slower ratio, I would likely just use something with a 6.3:1 or around that.

The technology of reels have changed a lot over the years, and I've never really kept up with it all so my comments are only general in nature.

Mike Cork is a lot more familiar with reels like you have, so his recommendations are some you can count on. All those reels you have seem to have great reputations, so you may even want to experiment some with what lures you'll use with each one, as sometimes the "feel" is a better indication of what to use as anything. That's been the case with me a lot of the time when choosing gear.  I may have bought it with a purpose in mind, then actually liked it better for a different purpose. :)



Last Edit: March 28, 2021, 11:52:27 AM by bigjim5589
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zippyduck

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Like BigJim, I also am more into speeds than what reel for specific techniques.
But I have some of the faster reels.

For jigs, t-rigs, and flipping I use a 9:1 and 8:1
For buzzbait, spinnerbaits, swimjigs, rattletraps, and most topwater I use a 7:1
For all my cranks, swimbaits, and chatterbaits I use a 6.3:1

Now the other thing to think about is line capacity.
For techniques like topwater, cranking, and swimbaits I want a high capacity reel for long casts.
For pitching , skipping, and other short controled casts I go to reels like the Daiwa sv, and the Shimano DC reels.

So the 200 size reel in a slow retrieve would be great for cranking and swimbaits.
And a Daiwa svtw in a fast retrieve is great for skipping and jigs.

Just how I do it.




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1ReelFanatik

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I've never considered a certain reel for a certain type of bait.  I consider desired gear ratio and pick a reel with that ratio or one close to it.  I am much more concerned about which rod to use for various types of lures.  Reel not so much.

I want to learn to skip.  The Tatula SV would be my choice of those you listed.  Learning to skip is the only time I can think of at the moment where the reel is important to me.  Now if I was experienced at skipping, then the reel wouldn't be all that important.

 


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